Meet Yellowknife’s Steve Norn: Canada’s smartest person?

Yellowknife's Steve Norn. (Supplied by : CBC's Canada's Smartest Person.)
- Advertisement -

Steve Norn says he uses Jeopardy! and Scrabble to keep his mind sharp, and that recipe might have helped him become one of country’s smartest individuals.

The Yellowknife-based insurance broker will be featured in the third season premiere of CBC’s Canada’s Smartest Person on Nov. 13.

READ: Steve Norn’s profile for Canada’s Smartest Person

The show – which airs at 6:00 p.m. MT – puts some of the country’s smartest people through a series of challenges to determine overall intelligence.

- Advertisement -

Every week, contestants battle it out in front of a live studio audience in six categories: musical, physical, social, logical, visual and linguistic.

In the series finale, seven finalists will go head-to-head to earn the title of Canada’s Smartest Person.

While Norn, 40, can’t disclose the results of his episode, he told Moose FM he was ‘very proud’ of how he did.

“I was up against some pretty darn formidable competition,” he said.

“It’s one thing to sit there and scream at the contestants. It’s another thing to be in front of a live studio audience under the bright lights when you have to think on your feet.

- Advertisement -

“That is a very, very tough thing to do. I’m very proud of how I did.”

Originally from Fort Resolution, Norn said the experience of shooting in front of a live audience was surreal but also a ‘hoot.’

‘Put yourself out there’

Norn, a former RCMP officer, hopes his story will motivate Indigenous youth to try something new and reach their full potential.

- Advertisement -

The father of three says he used to drink heavily, but that all changed four years ago when he decided to go sober.

Nowadays, he wants to lead by example and show his kids that they shouldn’t be afraid to put themselves out there.

“I want to be a positive role model for kids in smaller communities and show them that it’s okay to take risks,” he said. “Get out of the communities, go explore. You’re going to make mistakes but that’s okay.

“You can’t expect people to do everything for you, you have to do it yourself. Put yourself out there because who knows what will happen.”

Norn says he also likes to give back to his community by coaching soccer and performing live music at cultural events.

You can learn more about who he’ll be competing against here.

- Advertisement -