NWT cabin draw: those lucky numbers in full

Cabin
Cabin not included. Actual size may vary. Some assembly required. (Photo: Joseph/Flickr.)
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Roll up, roll up, get your cabin – if you’re one of these 22 ballot holders.

The territorial government’s ballot draw for cabin lots on the Ingraham Trail took place on Monday night at Yellowknife’s Northern United Place.

There were 912 entries, but space for only 225 people inside what became a packed building for the draw. Others had to wait outside.

The Department of Lands promised to notify every winner, whether or not they found space and time to attend the draw in person.

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Those lucky cabin lot ballot numbers in full: (Lot selection number, ballot number.)

1. 50485
2. 51003
3. 50599
4. 51124
5. 50359
6. 50753
7. 50795
8. 50625
9. 51081
10. 50450
11. 50503
12. 51111
13. 50323
14. 50334
15. 50553
16. 50607
17. 50823
18. 51116
19. 51072
20. 50748
21. 50983
22. 50596

“This is great,” we hear you say, “but we came here for the gossip. Who actually won?” Alas, that information is not published on the night of the draw. Only the ballot numbers are publicized. The only way you’ll find out the actual names of winners, for now, is if they decide to go public.

Alternate numbers: (In case any of the above don’t show or otherwise cannot fulfil their obligation to acquire a lot.)

23. 50981
24. 50422
25. 50643
26. 51098
27. 50701
28. 51054
29. 50831
30. 51078
31. 50826
32. 50847
33. 50393
34. 50603
35. 50507
36. 51142
37. 50347
38. 50361
39. 50989
40. 51001
41. 50887
42. 50837
43. 50404
44. 50266

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What happens next? 

All the information you need if you’re a winner is on the Department of Lands website.

If your ballot was drawn, you can rest easy: the Department of Lands will contact you – or your listed proxy – with details about the lot selection meeting being held on Wednesday in Yellowknife. Either you or your proxy have to attend that meeting if you won, otherwise you’ll probably lose your chance.

All outstanding balances with the Department of Lands must be paid before a lease application can be approved.

You then have two years, from signing your lease, to complete construction of your cabin – with a potential one-year extension but no more than that. If you get your cabin up and it meets all the legal requirements, your lease will be extended to a total of 30 years. (After 30 years you can apply to have it renewed, but at this point you’re probably thinking a little long-term.)

There’s a full FAQ here.

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