Early daffodil calamity befalls NWT cancer charity – help needed

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British Columbia’s unusually warm winter is causing unexpected problems for a northern cancer charity.

The Canadian Cancer Society in the NWT sells daffodils each April to raise money for cancer research and patient care.

The daffodils are grown in BC – where conditions over the past few months have been some of the warmest on record.

That means the daffodils are in bloom surprisingly early.

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“Normally our daffodil campaign is always in April,” said Nikki Grobbecker, from the Canadian Cancer Society’s NWT chapter.

“This year, we are starting in March – Mother Nature has taken its course.

“The daffodils have just been growing too quickly in BC because of the nice, warm weather.”

Ordinarily, a bunch of overeager daffodils wouldn’t be a problem.

However, the early start means a clash in Yellowknife with several other events, like spring break and the Long John Jamboree festival.

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As a result, volunteers with spare time are thin on the ground.

Grobbecker says she urgently needs more help distributing around 80,000 daffodils this weekend (March 27-29), otherwise the society could end up losing income – and funding for the fight against cancer.

“If the daffodils don’t get sold, then that’s a loss of income for us,” she told Moose FM.

“The quality of the daffodils is going to be much better if they get into homes quicker. That’s why it’s important that we get sales going on the weekend.

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“We are really looking for volunteers on the weekend, as well as during the day next week. So shift workers, as well as anyone available during the day, we’d love to have you come on board and sell these daffodils.”

If you can help, contact Nikki on (867) 920-4428.

The daffodils will be available in Yellowknife at Trevor’s Independent, the Co-op, the downtown liquor store, Walmart and the Centre Square mall. Flowers are also being sent out to the NWT’s smaller communities.

BC has enjoyed flowers in bloom and double-digit temperatures since early February.

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