Canada’s North in store for ‘warmer than normal’ winter

Soon, we'll see more grass than snow.
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The Weather Network is predicting a cold and potentially stormy winter for most of the country, but not necessarily in the North.

The network recently issued its winter forecast and suggests it will be a ‘more traditional Canadian winter’ this year.

Meteorologists are predicting that this winter’s weather won’t have much in common with last year’s comparatively balmy temperatures.

That’s largely because of La Niña, a climate phenomenon that can heavily influence North American weather patterns.

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La Niña is the opposite of El Niño, which is characterized by warm waters in the tropical Pacific. La Niña, on the other hand, brings unusually cooler ocean temperatures.

This year, forecasters are predicting a weak La Niña and not a strong El Niño like we’ve seen in recent years.

Meteorologists say that could result in colder – albeit inconsistent – temperatures across most of the country over the next couple months.

Areas that will experience colder than average temperatures include Saskatchewan, Manitoba, most of Ontario and western Quebec.

On the other hand, places that are expected to be consistently warmer than normal include the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Yukon and parts of northern Quebec and Labrador.

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“Locations such as Whitehorse, Yellowknife, and Happy Valley-Goose Bay are among the few in Canada who can expect above normal temperatures this winter,” the weather agency stated on its website.

“Keep in mind that these forecasts are all relative to climatological averages, so even though these regions will be above normal, anyone seeking to escape winter weather will still have to travel well south of the border.”

Meanwhile, precipitation is expected to be above average in all forms – rain, snow and sleet – across most of the country.

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