Caroline Cox — filming Arctic growers

Marjorie, a Tuktoyaktuk resident, smells one of the plants grown in the community's greenhouse. (Supplied by Food for the Rest of Us.)
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Growing food in the Arctic Circle is not an easy task.

But Director Caroline Cox’s new film “Food for the Rest of Us,” tells the story of people who are doing just that.

“The High Arctic is really tied to climate change and the changes in the land — kind of both sides of the coin where people are able to grow a bit more food, traditionally Inuit generally weren’t farmers. But then also because of climate change, the hunting and fishing cycles are changing and it’s actually getting harder to find food on the land.”

Caroline Cox

The film tells the story of food growers in four communities, Tuktoyaktuk, Colorado, Hawaii and Kansas City.

All the growing projects are connected to a social movement.

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Some use their food to support the Black Lives Matter movement, while the Tuktoyaktuk growers are using food growing to combat the loss of their traditional lifestyles due to climate change.

“There’s a lot of systems in place in Canada that really press and hold down Indigenous people … It’s really an example of people surviving on their own term and using food is the method to thrive.”

Cox hopes the documentary will be used in schools as an educational tool, and make people think about where their food comes from.

The film is slated to be screened at the Doxa International Documentary Festival. 

Normally the annual event is held in Vancouver, but is being streamed virtually this year from May 6 to 16.

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